03/04/2016

Catpuccinos!

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Je dressai immédiatement quand je ne lis que le titre de la série Elena Efremova: "Cats Coffee." Le café et les chats? Dans chaque image, un goutte à goutte de café ruisselle vers le bas du côté de sa tasse et se répand sur le sketchbook ouvert, où il est maintenant la queue d'un chat! L'artiste dit chaque chat a son propre caractère, comme tout type de café a sa propre saveur. descriptions d'accompagnement de Efremova pour la personnalité des chats est tout simplement adorable!

Pour chaque photo, un style différent de boire du café est préparé d'une manière qui met en valeur les traits du café ainsi, comme latte art romantique sur la cappuccino sucré ou un côté de croissants dans un café de la rue pour le café français. Le biais de Efremova sort habilement dans le dessin de sa boisson personnelle préférée: café à la crème glacée est un chat noir et blanc blottir doucement. Je ne peux pas obtenir assez quand il vient à griffonnages de chats ou de café, donc les voir magnifiquement réunis comme cela me Hypes jusqu'à plus d'un coup de espurresso.

from at http://www.sartonline.org/

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Jack Vettriano Paintings

13/10/2015

Max Beckmann

"Max Beckmann was born into a middle-class family in Leipzig, Saxony. From his youth he pitted himself against the old masters. His traumatic experiences of World War I, in which he volunteered as a medical orderly, coincided with a dramatic transformation of his style from academically correct depictions to a distortion of both figure and space, reflecting his altered vision of himself and humanity.

He is known for the self-portraits painted throughout his life, their number and intensity rivaled only by those of Rembrandt and Picasso. Well-read in philosophy and literature, Beckmann also contemplated mysticism and theosophy in search of the ""Self"". As a true painter-thinker, he strove to find the hidden spiritual dimension in his subjects. (Beckmann's 1948 Letters to a Woman Painter provides a statement of his approach to art.)
Max Beckmann Self-portrait with Horn, 1938-1940

Beckmann enjoyed great success and official honors during the Weimar Republic. In 1925 he was selected to teach a master class at the Städelschule Academy of Fine Art in Frankfurt. Some of his most famous students included Theo Garve, Leo Maillet and Marie-Louise von Motesiczky. In 1927 he received the Honorary Empire Prize for German Art and the Gold Medal of the City of Düsseldorf; the National Gallery in Berlin acquired his painting The Bark and, in 1928, purchased his Self-Portrait in Tuxedo. By the early 1930s, a series of major exhibitions, including large retrospectives at the Städtische Kunsthalle Mannheim (1928) and in Basle and Zurich (1930), together with numerous publications, showed the high esteem in which Beckmann was held.

His fortunes changed with the rise to power of Adolf Hitler, whose dislike of Modern Art quickly led to its suppression by the state. In 1933, the Nazi government called Beckmann a ""cultural Bolshevik"" and dismissed him from his teaching position at the Art School in Frankfurt. In 1937 the government confiscated more than 500 of his works from German museums, putting several on display in the notorious Degenerate Art exhibition in Munich. The day after Hitler's radio speech about degenerate art in 1937, Beckmann left Germany with his second wife, Quappi, for The Netherlands.
Max Beckmann, 1918-19, The Night (Die Nacht), oil on canvas, 133 x 154 cm, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf

For ten years, Beckmann lived in self-imposed exile in Amsterdam, failing in his desperate attempts to obtain a visa for the United States. In 1944 the Germans attempted to draft him into the army, although the sixty-year-old artist had suffered a heart attack. The works completed in his Amsterdam studio were even more powerful and intense than the ones of his master years in Frankfurt. They included several large triptychs, which stand as a summation of Beckmann's art.

After the war, Beckmann moved to the United States. During the last three years of his life, he taught at the art schools of Washington University in St. Louis (with the German-American painter and printmaker Werner Drewes) and the Brooklyn Museum. He came to St. Louis at the invitation of Perry T. Rathbone, who was director of the Saint Louis Art Museum. Rathbone arranged for Washington University in St. Louis to hire Beckmann as an art teacher, filling a vacancy left by Philip Guston, who had taken a leave. The first Beckmann retrospective in the United States took place in 1948 at the City Art Museum, Saint Louis. In St. Louis, Morton D. May became his patron and, already an avid amateur photographer and painter, a student of the artist. May later donated much of his large collection of Beckmann's works to the St. Louis Art Museum. Beckmann also helped him learn to appreciate Oceanian and African art. After stops in Denver and Chicago, he and Quappi took an apartment at 38 West 69th Street in Manhattan. In 1949 he obtained a professorship at the Art School of New York's Brooklyn Museum.

He suffered from angina pectoris and died after Christmas 1950, struck down by a heart attack at the corner of 61st Street and Central Park West in New York, not far from his apartment building. As the artist’s widow recalled, he was on his way to see one of his paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Beckmann had a one-man show at the Venice Biennale of 1950, the year of his death.
Themes
Max Beckmann, Carnival, 1943, triptych, oil on canvas, University of Iowa Museum of Art

Unlike several of his avant-garde contemporaries, Beckmann rejected non-representational painting; instead, he took up and advanced the tradition of figurative painting. He greatly admired not only Cézanne and Van Gogh, but also Blake, Rembrandt, and Rubens, as well as Northern European artists of the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance, such as Bosch, Bruegel, and Matthias Grünewald. His style and method of composition are partially rooted in the imagery of medieval stained glass.

Engaging with the genres of portraiture, landscape, still life, and history painting, his diverse body of work created a very personal but authentic version of modernism, one with a healthy deference to traditional forms. Beckmann reinvented the religious triptych and expanded this archetype of medieval painting into an allegory of contemporary humanity.

From his beginnings in the fin de siècle to the period after World War II, Beckmann reflected an era of radical changes in both art and history in his work. Many of Beckmann‘s paintings express the agonies of Europe in the first half of the 20th century. Some of his imagery refers to the decadent glamor of the Weimar Republic's cabaret culture, but from the 1930s on, his works often contain mythologized references to the brutalities of the Nazis. Beyond these immediate concerns, his subjects and symbols assume a larger meaning, voicing universal themes of terror, redemption, and the mysteries of eternity and fate."

Max Beckmann Paintings

The acrobats, 1939

The acrobats, 1939

The artist and his wife - Max Beckmann

The artist and his wife - Max Beckmann

Afternoon, 1946

Afternoon, 1946

Blindman's buff, 1945

Blindman's buff, 1945

Quappi in blue in a boat, 1926-1950

Quappi in blue in a boat, 1926-1950

Small Landscape, Viareggio - Max Beckmann

Small Landscape, Viareggio - Max Beckmann

The mill, 1947

The mill, 1947

Self-Portrait in Florence - Max Beckmann

Self-Portrait in Florence - Max Beckmann

Family Picture - Max Beckmann

Family Picture - Max Beckmann

The Little Fish, 1933

The Little Fish, 1933

Black Irises, 1928

Black Irises, 1928

The argonauts, 1949-1950

The argonauts, 1949-1950

Quappi in Pink - Max Beckmann

Quappi in Pink - Max Beckmann

Self-portrait with champagne glass - Max Beckmann

Self-portrait with champagne glass - Max Beckmann

The King, 1934-1937

The King, 1934-1937

Two Circus Artists or Snake Charmer and Clown - Max Beckmann

Two Circus Artists or Snake Charmer and Clown - Max Beckmann

Bird's hell, 1938

Bird's hell, 1938

Galleria Umberto, 1925

Galleria Umberto, 1925

The actors, 1942

The actors, 1942

Portrait of Quappi in pink and purple, 1931

Portrait of Quappi in pink and purple, 1931

Perseus, 1940-1941

Perseus, 1940-1941

The dream - Max Beckmann

The dream - Max Beckmann

Beginnning, 1949

Beginnning, 1949

The Three Sisters

The Three Sisters

12/10/2015

Hans Fredrik Gude

Hans Fredrik Gude

"Hans Fredrik Gude (13 March 1825 – 17 August 1903) was a Norwegian romanticist painter and is considered along with Johan Christian Dahl to be one of Norway's foremost landscape painters. He has been called a mainstay of Norwegian National Romanticism. He is associated with the Düsseldorf school of painting.

Gude's artistic career was not one marked with drastic change and revolution, but was instead a steady progression that slowly reacted to general trends in the artistic world. Gude's early works are of idyllic, sun-drenched Norwegian landscapes which present a romantic, yet still realistic view of his country. Around 1860 Gude began painting seascapes and other coastal subjects. Gude had difficulty with figure drawing initially and so collaborated with Adolph Tidemand in some of his painting, drawing the landscape himself and allowing Tidemand to paint the figures. Later Gude would work specifically on his figures while at Karlsruhe, and so began populating his paintings with them. Gude initially painted primarily with oils in a studio, basing his works on studies he had done earlier in the field. However, as Gude matured as a painter he began to paint en plein air and espoused the merits of doing so to his students. Gude would paint with watercolors later in life as well as gouache in an effort to keep his art constantly fresh and evolving, and although these were never as well received by the public as his oil paintings, his fellow artists greatly admired them.

Gude spent forty-five years as an art professor and so he played an important role in the development of Norwegian art by acting as a mentor to three generations of Norwegian artists. Young Norwegian artists flocked to wherever Gude was teaching, first at the Academy of Art in Düsseldorf and later at the School of Art in Karlsruhe. Gude also served as a professor at the Berlin Academy of Art from 1880 to 1901, although he attracted few Norwegians to the Berlin Academy because by this time Berlin had been surpassed in prestige in the eyes of young Norwegian artists by Paris.

Over the course of his lifetime Gude won numerous medals, was inducted as an honorary member into many art academies, and was awarded the Grand Cross of the Order of St. Olav. He was the father of painter Nils Gude."

Hans Fredrik Gude Paintings

The Jetty at Feste near Moss

The Jetty at Feste near Moss

Hauling in the Nets

Hauling in the Nets

Ladies in the Sunshine

Ladies in the Sunshine

From Torekov the Kattegat

From Torekov the Kattegat

Steamship at Drøbak

Steamship at Drøbak

Summer landscape

Summer landscape

Man in a Rowboat

Man in a Rowboat

Beach Stones

Beach Stones

Phillipshafen, Rügen

Phillipshafen, Rügen

Norwegian mountains

Norwegian mountains

Forest Landscape with Lake

Forest Landscape with Lake

Berg, Study

Berg, Study

Snow in the Mountains

Snow in the Mountains